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The performance of software systems is dramatically affected by how well software designers understand the basic hardware technologies at work in a system. Similarly, hardware designers must understand the far-reaching effects their design decisions have on software applications. For readers in either category, this classic introduction to the field provides a look deep in The performance of software systems is dramatically affected by how well software designers understand the basic hardware technologies at work in a system. Similarly, hardware designers must understand the far-reaching effects their design decisions have on software applications. For readers in either category, this classic introduction to the field provides a look deep into the computer. It demonstrates the relationships between the software and hardware and focuses on the foundational concepts that are the basis for current computer design.


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The performance of software systems is dramatically affected by how well software designers understand the basic hardware technologies at work in a system. Similarly, hardware designers must understand the far-reaching effects their design decisions have on software applications. For readers in either category, this classic introduction to the field provides a look deep in The performance of software systems is dramatically affected by how well software designers understand the basic hardware technologies at work in a system. Similarly, hardware designers must understand the far-reaching effects their design decisions have on software applications. For readers in either category, this classic introduction to the field provides a look deep into the computer. It demonstrates the relationships between the software and hardware and focuses on the foundational concepts that are the basis for current computer design.

30 review for Computer Organization & Design: The Hardware/Software Interface

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rex

    I remember when I first learn computer architecture in China. The book we used is terribly complicated. I once thought computer architecture as a subject with random things to memorized. Fortunately, I study this book years later in the US. It goes through the fundamental philosophy of computer architecture design and it gives lots of examples, pictures, and exercises to help you understand the concept. The book not only talks about simple examples, it also break the real machine down I remember when I first learn computer architecture in China. The book we used is terribly complicated. I once thought computer architecture as a subject with random things to memorized. Fortunately, I study this book years later in the US. It goes through the fundamental philosophy of computer architecture design and it gives lots of examples, pictures, and exercises to help you understand the concept. The book not only talks about simple examples, it also break the real machine down to show how the principles in the book being applied in the real world. I find that very fascinating! I also teach this subject for undergraduate students. By going through the flow of the book, the student are able to understand the fundamental principles of computer architecture. This book is a true learner-centric textbook!

  2. 5 out of 5

    YouKneeK

    This textbook was required reading for my Computer Organization and Architecture university course. Sometimes it can be difficult to give a textbook a fair review because, in a typical course, students are rarely required to read the entire book and they may be given reading assignments that are not in sequential order. This means it’s not easy to judge the progression of the material as presented in the textbook from beginning to end. Such was the case with this textbook. In my class This textbook was required reading for my Computer Organization and Architecture university course. Sometimes it can be difficult to give a textbook a fair review because, in a typical course, students are rarely required to read the entire book and they may be given reading assignments that are not in sequential order. This means it’s not easy to judge the progression of the material as presented in the textbook from beginning to end. Such was the case with this textbook. In my class, we skipped around and read different sections from different chapters rather than reading any single chapter all the way through. One thing I was impressed with, given how much we skipped around, was how easy it was to pick up each section we were asked to read. Even if it was a section in the middle of a chapter we hadn’t read from before. Unlike some textbooks I’ve read, there weren’t any cryptic terms or acronyms that I couldn’t easily find the definition to. Definitions for new terminology were noted in the margins, making it easy to refer back to them if needed. In general, explanations were clear and the examples were good. However, there were quite a few grammatical/spelling errors and there was some awkward phrasing that required rereading in order to understand what the authors were trying to convey. Sometimes they skipped intermediate topics, such as jumping from a single-cycle datapath to a pipelined datapath without covering the multi-cycle datapath which I understand was in previous editions of the book. My university course provided very good supplementary content and I found the concepts easy to understand when presented in that logical progression. I might have struggled more if I had been limited to the book's presentation, but it's hard to say for sure since I wasn't in that position. I don’t normally comment much on the physical aspect of books I read, but this book was literally falling apart as I read it. School textbooks are the only type of book that I still purchase in a physical format, and this textbook was no exception. I saw a couple reviews on Amazon where reviewers mentioned that their pages fell out, but I needed the textbook and I wanted it in a physical format, so I bought it with the plan to be extra careful with the pages. Sure enough, as soon as I started reading, pages started randomly falling out. I would gingerly turn a page, and sometimes the page would turn and come out of the book. I don’t resell my textbooks, but anybody who does probably wouldn’t be able to resell this one. Maybe that was the goal… The falling pages became quite a problem for me because I took several business trips while taking this course and I was afraid to travel with the book. I didn’t want to have pages falling out all over the place and getting lost where I would never find them again, and I figured the flimsy book would never survive my laptop bag or my suitcase, so I purchased the e-book version of the textbook to use while traveling. The e-book version had its own issues. There weren’t any page numbers, which could be a problem when I needed to reference specific pages for my class, and the tables and diagrams were very small. I was reading on a 10.5” tablet, with a screen nearly as big as the pages in the physical book, but the size in the e-book was drastically different from the size on the printed page and did not fully utilize the space. I constantly had to zoom in on them so I could read them, which meant I couldn’t see them in context with the text on the page. Perhaps all of this is normal with e-textbooks; I haven’t read enough of textbooks in this format to know. It definitely frustrated me, though. If I could give half stars, I would give this book 3.5 stars.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nikoleta

    Probably the best textbook I've ever read. Everything is actually explained and the examples aren't overbearing. The content itself can get a bit dry but still very useful. However, the amount of typos is ridiculous.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Stefan Kanev

    This is a good textbook, but I would recommend picking it up unless you have a lot of time (or you are studying it in a course). I started reading it because I realized my understanding for processors was ancient and wanted to update it a bit. It does go into the new and fancy stuff, but it definitely helps you get a good overview. After you've finished it, you'll have a good idea how to (conceptually) build a basic computer. Two major caveats: the writing is a bit boring and academical (to be e This is a good textbook, but I would recommend picking it up unless you have a lot of time (or you are studying it in a course). I started reading it because I realized my understanding for processors was ancient and wanted to update it a bit. It does go into the new and fancy stuff, but it definitely helps you get a good overview. After you've finished it, you'll have a good idea how to (conceptually) build a basic computer. Two major caveats: the writing is a bit boring and academical (to be expected out of a textbook) and it will take ages to read it. If you're interest is just casual, you might be better by picking Code by Petzold (although that is quite basic and matches my "ancient" knowledge about processors).

  5. 4 out of 5

    David

    Used this as my textbook for ECE425 - Computer Architecture and thought it explained a lot more than what the professor tried to teach. I would recommend reading this a few times before listening to the professor go over whichever topic you're covering and I'm sure it'll help you. I recommend also watching these videos throughout the course http://nptel.iitm.ac.in/video.php?sub... Passed Computer Architecture

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ayush Bhat

    This is almost a standard book for computer organization but takes a lot of time per page. This is kind of a prerequisite to read the Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach from the same authors.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brock Pereira

    I understand why this book is the “hallmark” of hardware design textbooks, but I couldn’t help but want to bang my head off the desk during this class. Otherwise - great book, easy to read and understand

  8. 4 out of 5

    Samuel

    Machine structures course.

  9. 5 out of 5

    سليمة

    Essential book for anyone interested in computer architecture

  10. 5 out of 5

    Fahad Ghouri

    Excellent insight into basic computer architecture and design! Very good for getting a basic understanding and making you ready to work through higher concepts.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Collen Jones

    A truly solid overview of system architecture with excellent sections on history and common fallacies but also a bit of a slog at times.

  12. 4 out of 5

    بلال مہربان

    This was my course book in Software engineering 4th semester. Every thing in the book was so detailed that most of the time i did't needed my professors help to understand the concepts.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Victor

    Very good introduction and reminder for computer architecture, reviewing all topics such as instruction decoding, memory hierarchies, pipelines, I/O, computer clusters, vector computers, GPUS, energy consumption. In my opinion some previous knowledge must be got before reading this book, since it omits many implementation details. Appendix are added so that you can extend your knowledge in more advanced topics. For those understanding Spanish, I strongly recommend this other book: Con Very good introduction and reminder for computer architecture, reviewing all topics such as instruction decoding, memory hierarchies, pipelines, I/O, computer clusters, vector computers, GPUS, energy consumption. In my opinion some previous knowledge must be got before reading this book, since it omits many implementation details. Appendix are added so that you can extend your knowledge in more advanced topics. For those understanding Spanish, I strongly recommend this other book: Conceptos básicos de arquitectura y sistemas operativos: Curso de Ordenadores. Gregorio Fernández. It probably better explains many details such as microarchitecture and micro programming omited in the Hennesy-Patterson book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ibrahim Al-bluwi

    This was the textbook of a university course that I took during my BSc. Although I am not a big fan of hardware and assembly languages I enjoyed studying from this book to a great extent. The book is very well written and very well organized. I found the presented information clear and I liked the way the authors emphasize what is important, elaborate with examples, and keep extra details to the end of each chapter.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Muhamamd Daneshgar

    This book is one of my most hated books. Its prolix style make your mind exhausted with loads of jejune materials. I know it's a very famous academic textbooks and scholars applaud it. Perhaps it's catered for professors rather than for engineers and true learners. In a nutshell, the efficiency of this book is very poor. You learn very little in expense of wasting a good deal of your precious time.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ben Haley

    This book drew abstract mathematical concepts down to their underpinning hardware implementations. In doing so, it clarified the practical concerns that drive the development of new software systems. Patterson, who is brilliant in his straightforward execution does a great job of revealing that the land of information does have a bottom where it grinds up against a land of silicon and copper. For me it's a relief.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jonas

    A solid introduction at the freshman level, but just not all that inspiring. The basic chapters, especially the one on assembly languages and the appendix on logic design, are very good; the later chapters unfortunately feel a bit rushed and really only cover the barest essentials. Additionally, some pretty important content, e.g. on GPUs and Verilog, is only available online. The exercises are numerous and quite good.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dilshan Jayakody

    Even this book is recommended to use as a textbook I use it as quick reference. All the chapters are well organized and up to date. Most of the chapters are based on modern hardware platforms like ARM and x86. Highly recommended as textbook for computer architecture and related courses. up to now the only bad thing which I notice in this book is some of the content are in the supplied CD-ROM, which is bit annoying sometimes.

  19. 4 out of 5

    João

    I am currently teaching a BSc-level course using this book. It is very well structured for either "hardcore" hardware-related courses or more software-inclined (or at least not so low-level hardware) courses. I have mixed feelings towards the approach of anticipating some issues of multicore architectures (e.g. cache coherence) w.r.t. to the description of the corresponding architectures in Chapter 7.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Szymon Wylezol

    A great and easy to follow book, and certainly the most comprehensive one on computer architecture. The only drawback is the material on the included cd - there is too much of it to print it, and reading it all on screen is not very comfortable. Perhaps it's time to split the book into two volumes. Otherwise a great buy. [my review from amazon]

  21. 4 out of 5

    كوثر الشريفي

    I had no idea about the MIPS assembly language, nor did I know much about designing processors..etc. This book really helped me in understanding the various steps involved in designing processors and so many other concepts that any beginner needs. The examples and problems are really good, as well as the explanation.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Another of my college texts. Although I have not found a need to reference this book since graduation, it was useful in developing an understanding the components within a computing system and how they interact, possible problems, and how to address them at design time.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Apatiga

    This computer organization and design textbook was interesting from chapter one to the very end, including the appendixes. I think I could have learned all that I learned from my computer organization teacher from this book alone, however, that was not always the case.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Parastoo

    This is one of the few required text books for my courses which I actually enjoyed while reading, I learned a lot and it gave me a whole new perspective of what is a computer. I would suggest this to all undergraduate computer students.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Colin

    A good, solid introduction to Computer Architecture. I flicked through it this time, because I've read it before. My one niggle is that it has a tendency to use analogies which I don't think really help. Possibly this is because I'm boring an technical, though.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tony Poerio

    Standard CS/Eng textbook. Gets the job done. Word of advice: don't get the digital version, they layout is almost unreadable. Got the Kindle version, then ended up using my friend's hard copy all semester.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hawk

    Probably the best CompOrg/CompArch textbook I've encountered thus far.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Justin Smith

    If you want to know how Assembly and Computer works this is probably your best bet. You'll know what a stack and heap really are and where things are in memory.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Haytham Lashin

    I'm currently reading chapter 7 , and it's really a very good introduction to the Computer Architecture course .

  30. 5 out of 5

    Maxim Perepelitsyn

    A very good introduction to computer architecture. The GPU coverage is a plus. Make sure to check out all the online materials for this book.

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